Malaria

By Hamsa Al-Aqqad, MS Despite decades of efforts to combat malaria, it remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide and no effective vaccine exists currently. According to UNICEF, malaria kills one child per minute and mostly affects children in Africa, where 90% of all deaths due to…

Repairing Myelin as an Element in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

By Sandy Hayes, PhD Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a degenerative neurological disease in which cells of the immune system invade and attack the central nervous system (CNS). A major target of this attack is myelin, the protective insulation surrounding axons (nerve fibers) that facilitates the rapid transmission of nerve impulses…

Tuberculosis: Age – Old Disease, Modern – Day Threat

By Hamsa Al-Aqaad What is Tuberculosis? Tuberculosis, or TB, is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis [1,2]. It typically affects the lungs, and in this case it is called pulmonary TB. Sometimes, other parts of the body can be infected; these include the brain and…

Osteoporosis Overview

By Wendy Brody, Pharm. D. Osteoporosis is the most common bone disorder affecting humans12. Bone strength is compromised, thus predisposing one to an increased risk of fractures of the hip, spine and wrists.1Both men and women can develop osteoporosis, although men usually have a lower risk than women. During…

Chromosomal Shattering

By Perry McLimore, MD., JD. Introduction Our DNA is located on chromosomes in the cell’s nucleus. Human beings possess 23 pairs or 46 chromosomes within a cell. All normal cells in the human body contain 46 chromosomes. DNA is composed of 4 nucleotides: Adenine, Guanine, Thymine, and Cytosine, or…

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